Notes to the consolidated financial statements, IFRS 

1. Accounting principles

Basis of presentation

SATO Corporation is a Finnish public limited company domiciled in Helsinki, Finland. SATOs registered address is Panuntie 4, 00600 Helsinki. SATO Corporation and its subsidiaries together form the consolidated SATO Group (“SATO” or “the Group”).
   The Board of Directors has approved the 2016 financial statements on 1 February 2017. A copy of the company’s consolidated financial statements may be obtained from the abovementioned address.
   SATO provides housing solutions and its operations primarily consist of investment in housing properties. The focus of the Group’s operations is in the largest growth centres, and approximately 80 per cent of its investment property is located in the Helsinki region. The rest of the operations are located in Tampere, Turku, Oulu, Jyväskylä and St. Petersburg.
   SATO’s housing investments include both privately financed and state-subsidised housing assets. In respect of the latter SATO’s business is affected by special features of non-profit activities, which are the result of restrictions set on the company’s business for state-subsidised housing construction. The non-profit restrictions affect owner organisations through, inter alia, restrictions on distribution of the profit, divestment and risk-taking as well as through the prohibition of lending and providing collateral. Housing is also affected by property-specific, fixed-term restrictions, which apply to matters such as the use and handover of apartments, the selection of the residents, and the setting of rent. In respect of non-profit activities, SATO’s supervisory authorities are the Housing Fund of Finland (ARA), the State Treasury and the Ministry of the Environment, as well as local authorities in matters concerning the selection of residents.
   The main risks in selling and leasing homes consist of interest rates and changes in the housing demand.

General principles

SATOs consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adopted by the European Union observing the standards and interpretations effective on 31 December 2016. The notes to the financial statements are also in compliance with the Finnish accounting principles and corporate legislation.
   The information in the financial statements is stated in millions of euros. Figures presented in these financial statements have been rounded from exact figures and therefore the sum of figures presented individually can deviate from the presented sum figure.
   The preparation of IFRS financial statements requires judgement by the management in applying the accounting principles and making certain estimates and assumptions that are subject to uncertainty.
   In Note 2, information is given on key areas where management judgements or uncertainty factors in estimates and assumptions may cause the most significant effects on the figures presented.

Principles of consolidation

The consolidated financial statements are a consolidation of the financial statements of the parent company and the subsidiaries. Subsidiaries are companies over which the parent company has control. Control over a subsidiary is presumed to exist when the investor is exposed, or has rights to, variable returns from its involvement with the investee.
   Acquired subsidiaries are included in the consolidated financial statements from the date of acquisitions until the control ends. Acquired companies are included in the financial statements using the acquisition cost method. The net assets of the acquired company at the acquisition date are booked at the fair value of the land areas and buildings. Acquisitions of real property are generally treated as acquisitions of asset items.
   All intra-group transactions, internal receivables and payables, in addition to profit on internal transactions and the distribution of profit between Group companies are eliminated as part of the consolidation process.
   Mutual property companies and housing companies are treated as joint operations, which are consolidated by the proportionate consolidation method prescribed by the IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements standard. The proportionate method is applied to all such asset items irrespective of the Group’s holdings. The joint arrangements, in which the parties have joint control, are consolidated in SATO’s consolidated financial statements in accordance with IFRS 11, i.e., by the equity method.
   In SATO, the housing companies that own so-called shared ownership apartments are treated as structured entities. These are not included in the consolidated financial statements insofar as the companies are considered to be arrangements outside of SATO's operations, the purpose of which is to act on behalf of the people who have invested in shared ownership apartments. Those involved in the ownership arrangements are entitled to purchase the apartment for themselves after an agreed period and thus to benefit from any rise in the apartment’s value. SATO handles the governance and building management of the shared ownership properties.

Transactions denominated in foreign currencies

The financial statements of the Group entities are based on their primary functional currencies of the economic environment where the companies are operating. The presentation currency of the financial statements is the euro, which is also the functional currency of the parent company.
   Transactions in foreign currencies are translated in the functional currency using the exchange rate of the date of transactions. At the end of the accounting period all open balances of assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated into euros at the closing date exchange rate.
   Receivables and liabilities denominated in a foreign currency are translated using period-end exchange rates. Foreign exchange gains and losses related to the primary business are treated as adjustments to income or expenses. Investment-related foreign exchange gains and losses are treated as adjustments to investments. Financial foreign exchange gains and losses are reported under financial income and expenses. Foreign exchange gains and losses from translation of other assets and liabilities are reported in income statement. Unrealised gains and losses related to cash flow hedges are reported in other comprehensive income.
   The statements of income of foreign subsidiaries, whose functional currency is not the euro, are translated into euros based on the average exchange rate of the accounting period. Items in the statement of financial position, with the exception of income for the accounting period, are translated into euros at the closing-date exchange rate. Exchange rate differences arising from investments in subsidiaries with non-euro currency, as well as the exchange rate differences resulting from translating income and expenses at the average rates and assets and liabilities at the closing rate, are recorded in translation differences under equity. Respective changes during the period are presented in other comprehensive income.
   Translation differences from acquisition cost eliminations and post-acquisition profits and losses of foreign operations outside the euro area are recognised in the statement of comprehensive income. The cumulative translation differences related to foreign operations are reclassified from equity to statement of income upon the disposal of the foreign operation.

Investment Property

As defined in the IAS 40 Investment Property standard, investment properties are properties of which the Group retains possession in order to obtain rental income or appreciation in value and which are not occupied substantially for use by, or in the operations of, the Group, nor for sale in the ordinary course of business. In SATO, the housing companies that own so-called shared ownership apartments are treated as structured entities and thus not classified as investment property under IAS 40.
   At initial recognition, investment properties are booked at acquisition value, which includes transaction costs. Subsequently, investment properties are valued at fair value. Gains and losses from changes in fair value are booked through profit and loss in the period when they are incurred. Fair value of an investment property represents the price that would be received for the property in an orderly transaction, taking place in the local (principal) market at the reporting date, considering the condition and location of the property.
   Some of the investment properties are subject to legislative and usage restrictions. The so-called non-profit restrictions apply to the owning company and the so-called property-specific restrictions apply to the investment owned. The non-profit restrictions include, among other things, permanent limitations on the company’s operations, distribution of profit, lending and provision of collateral, and the divestment of investments. The property-specific restrictions include the use of apartments, the selection of residents, the setting of rent and divestment of apartments, and they are fixed-term.
   Investment properties under development, plus those subject to ARAVA legislation or legislation concerning interest-subsidised properties, are booked at the original acquisition cost, including the transaction costs. Later they are valued at the original acquisition cost less accumulated depreciation and impairments.
   An investment property is derecognised from the balance sheet when it is handed over or when the investment property is permanently removed from use and no future economic use can be expected from the handover. The profits and losses from divestments or removals from use of investment properties are presented on separate lines in the profit and loss account.

The fair values of investment properties are based on the following:

  • The sales comparison method is used in properties of which apartments can be sold individually without restrictions;
  • the properties which can only be sold as entire property and to a restricted group of buyers are valuated using the income value method; and
  • the fair values of properties under construction, interest-subsidised (short term) properties and ARAVA properties are estimated to be same as acquisition cost.

   The market value as at the date of the valuation is based on the average of the actual sales prices of comparable housings from the preceding 24 months.

Tangible assets

Tangible assets are valued at the original acquisition cost less accumulated depreciation and impairments. They are depreciated with the straight-line method over their estimated economic lives, which are as follows:

Machinery and equipment 5–10 years
Other tangible assets 3–6 years

   The economic life and residual value of assets are reassessed at each year-end. Changes in the future economic benefits found in the assessment are taken into account by adjusting the economic life and residual value of the assets. Profits and losses arising from sales and divestments of tangible assets are booked in the profit and loss account and presented as other income and expenses of business operations.

Intangible assets

An intangible asset is recognised in the balance sheet only if its acquisition cost can be determined reliably and it is likely that an expected economic benefit will accrue to the company from it.
   An intangible asset is valued at the original acquisition cost less depreciation and any impairment. Intangible assets consist largely of computer software, which is subjected to straight-line depreciation over 3–6 years.

Impairment

At the end of each reporting period it is assessed whether there is any indication that an asset may be impaired. If any such indication exists, the recoverable amount from the asset item is estimated. An asset is impaired if the carrying value exceeds the recoverable amount. An impairment loss is recognised in profit or loss.
   When an impairment loss is booked, the economic life of the asset item subject to depreciation is reassessed. The impairment loss booked against the asset item is cancelled if there is an increase in the value of the assessment used to determine the recoverable amount from the asset item.
   However, the increased carrying amount of an asset attributable to a reversal of an impairment loss shall not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined (net of amortisation or depreciation) had no impairment loss been recognised for the asset in prior years.

Inventories

Inventories are valued at acquisition cost or expected net realisable value if lower. Net realisable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business less the estimated costs of completion and the estimated costs necessary to make the sale.

Inventories are comprised of the following items:

  • Homes under construction, comprised of the portion of projects in progress booked at the balance sheet,
  • completed homes and commercial premises intended for sale but unsold at the date of closing of the books,
  • land areas and land area companies, which include the acquisition costs of unstated properties, and
  • other inventories, which are mostly comprised of projects being planned.

Financial instruments

SATO’s financial assets and liabilities are classified in accordance with IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement into the following categories: financial assets and liabilities at fair value through profit and loss, financial assets available for sale, loan and other receivables, financial liabilities at amortised cost, and effective cash flow hedges, measured at fair value through other comprehensive income. The instruments are classified at the time of the initial recognition and on the basis of the purpose of the instrument. Sales and purchases of financial instruments other than those associated with derivatives are booked on the clearance date. All derivatives are booked on the balance sheet on the trade date.

Financial assets and liabilities at fair value through profit and loss

The category includes derivative instruments for which hedge accounting in accordance with IAS 39 is not applied and are hence classified in trading portfolio. These instruments are valued at fair value and profits and losses arising from changes in the fair value, both realised and unrealised, are recognised in the income statement for the period.

Loan and other receivables

Loan and other receivables are nonderivative assets, for which the payments are fixed or can be determined. On the balance sheet, they are included in the accounts receivable and other receivables, in either current or non-current assets, according to their terms. Loans and other receivables are valued at amortised acquisition cost less any impairment. The Group books an impairment loss against accounts receivable when there are reasonable indications on the date of closing the books that the receivable will not be collected in full.

Financial assets available for sale

Financial assets available for sale are mostly stocks and shares. Investments in listed securities are valued in the financial statements at the buying prices quoted in an active market on the period closing date. Unlisted shares, the fair value of which cannot be determined reliably, are valued at the original acquisition cost or probable value if lower. Unrealised changes in the value of financial assets available for sale are booked in the other comprehensive income, with allowance for the deferred tax. Accumulated changes in fair value are not booked from the value adjustment fund to the profit and loss account until the investment is sold or its value has declined to such an extent that an impairment loss is to be booked against the investment.
   An entity shall recognise an impairment loss for any initial or subsequent write-down of the asset (or disposal group) to fair value less costs to sell. An impairment loss on equity investments classified as available for sale is not cancelled through the profit and loss account.

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents are comprised of cash in hand, bank accounts and liquid investments with maturities of three months or less at the date of initial recognition. Any negative balances of bank accounts with an overdraft facility are included in current liabilities. The cash and cash equivalents of non-profit companies are kept separate from those of companies not subject to non-profit restrictions.

Financial liabilities at amortised cost

Financial liabilities are initially recognized at fair value of the proceeds less transaction expenses. Later interest-bearing liabilities are valued at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Financial liabilities are included in non-current and current liabilities and they may be interest-bearing or non-interest-bearing. Interest is accrued in the income statement for the accounting period by the effective interest method.

Derivatives and hedge accounting

All derivatives are originally booked at fair value at the trade date, and are subsequently measured at fair value. The accounting treatment of profits and losses depends on the intended use of the derivatives. The Group documents the designation of hedging instruments to hedged items and makes its assessment as to whether the derivatives used for hedging are highly effective in negating the changes in the cash flows of the hedged items. The effectiveness is reviewed both when starting the hedging and after the event. The fair value of derivatives is calculated by discounting the contractual cash flows. The fair value of interest-rate options is calculated by using the market prices at the balance sheet date and option valuation models.
   The Group treats derivatives either as cash flow hedges for floating-rate loans or as derivatives for which hedge accounting under IAS 39 is not applied. Changes in value of derivatives subject to hedge accounting are booked in other comprehensive income. Gains and losses are transferred to the interest expenses in the income statement at the same time as the interest expenses on the hedged item. Any ineffective part of a hedging relationship is booked immediately in financial expenses. Changes in value of derivatives for which hedge accounting is not applied are booked in the financial items in income statement.

Provisions

Provisions are recognized when the Group has a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of past events, and the payment obligation is probable and the amount can be reliably estimated. The provision for refund claims includes guarantees related to new construction business and the 10-year warranty period after the completion of the work. The provision for refund claims is measured based on previous claims and assessments of previous experience. Other provisions recognised can include reorganisation reserves, litigation claim provisions and onerous contracts. A provision for onerous contracts is recognised when the unavoidable costs of meeting the obligations exceed the benefits received from the contract.

Principles of income recognition

Principles of income recognition for sales of new homes

Income from sales of newly built homes is recognised in compliance with the IAS 18 Revenue standard and the related IFRIC 15 Agreements for the Construction of Real Estate interpretation at the moment when the risks and benefits of the property have been transferred to the buyer. In respect of the homes sold during construction, the risks and benefits are deemed to be transferred on the completion date of the property, whereas for completed homes, they are transferred on the sale date.

Income from services

Income from services, such as client commissioning, is recognised when the service has been performed.


Lease agreements (SATO as lessor)

Rental income from investment properties is recognised in the profit and loss account in equal instalments over the lease period. When acting as a lessor, SATO has no agreements classified as financial leasing agreements.

Lease agreements (SATO as lessee)

Lease agreements in which SATO is the lessee are classified as financial lease agreements and they are booked as assets and debts if the risks and benefits have been transferred. Lease classification is made at the inception of the lease. At the commencement of the lease term, a finance lease is recognised on the balance sheet as an asset and liability at fair value or at the present value of the minimum lease payments, if lower. A tangible asset is depreciated during the economic retention of the asset in question or during the duration of the lease agreement. The rent to be paid is divided into the interest posted to the profit and loss account and the instalment on the financial debt.
   Lease agreements are classified as other lease agreements if the characteristic risks and benefits of ownership have not been transferred to a material extent. Rents to be paid on the basis of other lease agreements are booked as an expense in the profit and loss account in equal instalments over the lease period.

Borrowing costs

Borrowing costs are capitalised as part of an asset’s acquisition cost when they are due to the acquisition, construction or manufacture of an asset item which is directly derived from fulfilling the terms. An asset item fulfilling terms is one for which the completion for the intended purpose or for sale will inevitably require a considerable amount of time. Other borrowing costs are posted as an expense for the financial year in which they have occurred. Transaction costs directly due to the taking of loans, which can be attributed to a particular loan, are included in the original matched acquisition cost of the loan and matched as an interest expense using the effective interest rate method.

Public grants

Public grants, for example for lifts, are booked as decreases in the book value of tangible assets. Received grants therefore reduce the depreciation applied to the asset during its economic life. For SATO, the main form of public support is state-supported interest-subsidised loans and Housing Fund of Finland loans, in which state-backed projects receive a low-interest loan with the support of the state. The real interest on these loans is lower than the interest expenses would be on market-based loans. The interest advantage obtained through public support is therefore netted into interest expenses in accordance with IAS 20 Accounting for Government Grants and Disclosure of Government Assistance and is not shown as a separate item in the interest income.

Pension arrangements

SATO’s pension arrangements are classified as both defined-contribution and, for some sections of the personnel, defined-benefit arrangements. Contributions to defined-contribution pension arrangements are booked as an expense in the profit and loss account for the period in which the payment was made. The Group has no legal or actual obligation to make further payments if the recipient of the payments is unable to perform the payment of these pension benefits.
   Arrangements other than defined-contribution ones are treated as defined-benefit pension arrangements. At SATO, these include the supplementary pension arrangements for the management. Obligations arising from defined-benefit pension arrangements are calculated with a method based on the predicted unit of privilege.
   The current value of pension obligations, based on actuarial calculations, is posted to the balance sheet after deduction of the fair value of the assets pertaining to the pension arrangements at their current value. Pension expenditure is posted to the profit and loss account as an expense over the period of employment of the individuals.

Income taxes

Income taxes include the taxes based on the taxable profit for the financial year, adjustments to previous years’ taxes, and changes in deferred taxes. Deferred tax credits and liabilities are calculated from the differences between the taxation values of assets and debts and their book values according to IFRS. The tax rate set by the date of closing the books is used to determine the deferred taxes. The largest temporary differences arise from investment properties measured at fair value through profit and loss and from financial instruments measured at fair value through hedge reserve in other comprehensive income. A deferred tax credit is booked up to the amount at which it is likely that there will be taxable income in the future against which the temporary difference can be used.

Net operating income

Net operating income is the net sum formed when the net sales are reduced by operating expenses, i.e., property maintenance expenses, ground rents, new production expenses and the carrying value of land stock sold. Exchange gains and losses are included in net operating income when they arise from items related to ordinary business operations. Exchange gains and losses associated with financing are booked in financial income and expenses.


Operating profit

Operating profit is the net sum formed when the profits from divestments of investment properties, the share of the profit of joint ventures and associated companies, and other income from business operations and fair value changes are added to turnover, and the use of materials and services, personnel expenses, depreciation and impairments, losses from divestments of investment properties and other expenses of business operations are deducted. Exchange gains and losses are included in operating profit when they arise from items related to ordinary business operations. Exchange gains and losses associated with financing are booked in financial income and expenses.

New and amended standards applied in financial year ended

SATO has applied as from 1 January 2016 the following new and amended standards that have come into effect.

  • Annual Improvements to IFRSs (2012-2014 cycle) (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016): The annual improvements process provides a mechanism for minor and non-urgent amendments to IFRSs to be grouped together and issued in one package annually. The cycle contains amendments to four standards. Their impacts vary standard by standard but are not significant.
  • Amendment to IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements: Disclosure Initiative (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016). The amendments clarify the guidance in IAS 1 in relation to applying the materiality concept, disaggregating line items on the balance sheet and in the statement of profit or loss, presenting subtotals and to the structure and accounting policies in the financial statement. The amendments have had a minor impact on presentation in SATO’s consolidated financial statements.
  • Amendments to IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment and IAS 38 Intangible Assets - Clarification of Acceptable Methods of Depreciation and Amortisation (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016): The amendments state that revenue-based methods of depreciation cannot be used for property, plant and equipment and may only be used in limited circumstances to amortise intangible assets if revenue and the consumption of the economic benefits of the intangible assets are highly correlated. The amendments have had no impact on SATO’s consolidated financial statements.
  • Amendments to IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment and IAS 41 Agriculture - Bearer Plants (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016): These amendments allow biological assets that meet the definition of a bearer plant to be measured at cost instead of fair value. However the produce growing on bearer plants will continue to be measured at fair value less costs to sell under IAS 41. These amendments have had no impact on SATO’s consolidated financial statements.
  • Amendments to IAS 27 Separate Financial Statements – Equity Method in Separate Financial Statements (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016): The amendments to IAS 27 will allow entities to use the equity method to account for investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates in their separate financial statements. The amendments will not have an impact on SATO’s consolidated financial statements.
  • Amendments to IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements, IFRS 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities and IAS 28 Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures: Investment Entities: Applying the Consolidation Exception* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016): The amendments to IFRS 10, IFRS 12 and IAS 28 clarify the requirements for preparing consolidated financial statements when there are investment entities within the group. The amendments also provide relief for non-investment entities for equity accounting of investment entities. The amendments have had no impact on SATO’s consolidated financial statements.
  • Amendments to IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements - Accounting for Acquisitions of Interests in Joint Operations (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016): The amendments require business combination accounting to be applied to acquisitions of interests in a joint operation that constitutes a business. The amendments have had no impact on SATO’s consolidated financial statements.

Adoption of new and amended standards and interpretations applicable in future financial years

SATO has not yet adopted the following new and amended standards and interpretations already issued by the IASB. The Group will adopt them as of the effective date or, if the date is other than the first day of the financial year, from the beginning of the subsequent financial year.

* = not yet endorsed for use by the European Union as of 31 December 2016.

  • IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2018): The new standard replaces current IAS 18 and IAS 11 standards and related interpretations. In IFRS 15 a five-step model is applied to determine when to recognise revenue, and at which amount. Revenue is recognised when (or as) a company transfers control of goods or services to a customer either over time or at a point in time. The standard also introduces extensive new disclosure requirements. SATO has assessed the effects of the implementation of IFRS 15 on the consolidated financial statements with respect to the main revenue streams of the Group. The most significant revenue items in the scope of the new standard are revenues from the sale of new homes, as well as income from the sale of investment property and land. SATO will apply the new standard from 1 January 2018 with full retrospective application. Based on the Group’s assessment, the implementation of the standard will not have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements as to the revenue recognition of the mentioned revenue items. The standard will have an impact on the disclosures in SATO’s consolidated financial statements.
  • Amendments to IFRS 15 - Clarifications to IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2018). The amendments include clarifications and further examples on how to apply certain aspects of the five-step recognition model. The impact assessment of the clarifications has been included in the IFRS 15 impact assessment described above.
  • IFRS 9 Financial Instruments* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2018): IFRS 9 replaces the existing guidance in IAS 39. The new standard includes revised guidance on the classification and measurement of financial instruments, including a new expected credit loss model for calculating impairment on financial assets, and the new general hedge accounting requirements. It also carries forward the guidance on recognition and derecognition of financial instruments from IAS 39. The impact of IFRS 9 on SATO’s consolidated financial statements has been assessed by the management. The implementation of the new standard is not expected to have material impact on the classification or measurement of financial instruments in the consolidated financial statements, including hedge accounting. SATO will apply the new standard from 1 January 2018.
  • IFRS 16 Leases* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2019): The new standard replaces the current IAS 17 standard and related interpretations. IFRS 16 requires the lessees to recognise the lease agreements on the balance sheet as right-of-use assets and lease liabilities. The accounting model is similar to current finance lease accounting according to IAS 17. There are two exceptions available. These relate to either short term contracts in which the lease term is 12 months or less, or to low value items, i.e., assets of value USD 5 000 or less. The lessor accounting remains mostly similar to current IAS 17 accounting. The Group has commenced the preliminary impact assessment of the standard. It is assessed that the new standard will have an impact on the SATO’s consolidated financial statements as it concerns the Group as a lessor.
  • Amendments to IAS 7 Statement of Cash Flows - Disclosure Initiative* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2017). The changes were made to enable users of financial statements to evaluate changes in liabilities arising from financing activities, including both changes arising from cash flow and non-cash changes. The amendments have an impact on the disclosures in SATO’s consolidated financial statements.
  • Amendments to IAS 12 Income Taxes - Recognition of Deferred Tax Assets for Unrealised Losses* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2017). The amendments clarify that the existence of a deductible temporary difference depends solely on a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset and its tax base at the end of the reporting period, and is not affected by possible future changes in the carrying amount or expected manner of recovery of the asset. The amendments have no impact on SATO’s consolidated financial statements. 
  • Amendments to IFRS 2 Share-based payments - Clarification and Measurement of Share-based Payment Transactions* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2018). The amendments clarify the accounting for certain types of arrangements. Three accounting areas are covered: measurement of cash-settled share-based payments; classification of share-based payments settled net of tax withholdings; and accounting for a modification of a share-based payment from cash-settled to equity-settled. The amendments have no impact on SATO’s consolidated financial statements. 
  • Amendments to IFRS 4 Insurance Contracts - Applying IFRS 9 Financial Instruments with IFRS 4 Insurance Contracts* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2018). The amendments respond to industry concerns about the impact of differing effective dates by allowing two optional solutions to alleviate temporary accounting mismatches and volatility. The amendments have no impact on SATO’s consolidated financial statements.
  • Amendments to IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements and IAS 28 Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures – Sale or Contribution of Assets between an Investor and its Associate or Joint Venture* (the effective date has been postponed indefinitely). The amendments clarify the requirements in dealing with the sale or contribution of assets between an investor and its associate or joint venture. The amendments have no impact on SATO’s consolidated financial statements.